9/30/2012

Continuation to berimbolo defense, a berimbolo counter

I have realised that my worst imaginable opponent in a competition is a guy who is really flexible, good at berimbolo and pulls guard every time. I guess that is pretty much one of the Miyao brothers. Against this type of opponent I can not work my stand up or even pull guard because his expertise in the berimbolo makes double guard pull an unwise decision. When looking at the Miyaos fight, you notice that 90% of the time a double guard pull only leads to a faster back take unless your berimbolo is at the same level..and we all know it isn't.

In addition to my competition fears, I now have guys in training who use the berimbolo all the time, so I've been forced to look for solutions online. There are already many videos up there, but I think many of the defenses and counters are suspicios and don't fully understand how the berimbolo works.

I posted a good defense by Carlos Holanda of CheckMat here:

http://webjiujitsu.blogspot.pt/2012/04/more-about-how-to-defend-berimbolo.html

Now, I've stumbled on a good counter imo. Here is the video:


Weirdest injury I sustained this week

I've been fairly unlucky this week as I've got some cauliflower pains on my ear and some neck damage from landing funny..

However, I've never seen anything like my nose which has apparently bursted a vein


9/26/2012

Jacare documentary released

Being one of my favourite BJJ competitors of all time alongside Terere and Bill Cooper, I have been training Jacare's ankle pick takedown and tried to figure out more about his game during past weeks. Right on time, Jits Magazine released this mini-documentary about him.



9/24/2012

Leg reap rules causing headaches

Haven't been writing in a while, but I sure have been training. Started thinking of IBJJF leg reap rules today. According to IBJJF rules, a leg reap is basically when you "cross your outside foot inwards across your opponent's crotch".

I have felt the pain against the de la riva twist/berimbolo and understand why leg reap rules were created in the first place. This rule however seems to have some not so cool consequences such as limiting the use of one leg x-guard (although it doesn't really reap the knee) because your opponent can try to force you to reap from that position.

Now, I have managed to train one triangle escape to a level where I execute it in sparring against high level guys. Know I've started thinking there might be a possibility of an accidental leg reap if the opponent opens the triangle quickly.

The escape goes like this:

1. I grab opponent's sleeve or wrist with the hand not inside the triangle and sit down placing my foot on his armpit (like in spider guard but choosing the armpit instead of the bicep).


2. I lean back to the side of the triangle putting pressure directly on the spot where opponent's legs are crossed. For extra leverage I try to put my other foot on the opponent's hip/belly area similar to one leg x guard


I AM NOT SURE IF THIS IS A LEG REAP BECAUSE IT IS ONE THE BELLY AND NOT THE CROTCH AND THEREFORE THERE SHOULDN'T BE ANY DANGER TO THE KNEE. IF THIS IS A LEG REAP THEN THE MOUNT ESCAPE WHERE YOU SWING YOUR LEGS OVER YOUR OPPONENT'S BELLY IS A POTENTIAL REAP TOO.